how to tune parameters to slow down ocean surface currents

Discussion about modeling ice with ROMS

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liuxy
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Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 4:24 pm
Location: institute of meteorology

how to tune parameters to slow down ocean surface currents

#1 Post by liuxy » Sun Mar 21, 2010 3:41 am

Hi,
I'am working on simualting arctic ocean currents with ROMS (coupled with CSIM5) and found that the simulated surface currents were over influenced by Coriolis force and differed with resultes from others a lot . I wonder how can I tune model parameters to slow down ocean currents with wind forcing unchanged.

Thanks in advance for any comments or suggestions.

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kate
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Location: IMS/UAF, USA

Re: how to tune parameters to slow down ocean surface currents

#2 Post by kate » Mon Mar 22, 2010 6:38 pm

How are you handling the coupling to the ice? Are the ice speeds sensible?

I know a guy who could make his Arctic currents go either way, depending on variables we don't know very well. He gave up on modeling after that - maybe you should compare to observations rather than other models.

liuxy
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 4:24 pm
Location: institute of meteorology

Re: how to tune parameters to slow down ocean surface currents

#3 Post by liuxy » Tue Mar 23, 2010 2:58 pm

Thanks a lot for kate's response.
The ROMS supplies ocean currents, freeze/melt potential, and sea surface tilts to CSIM5. In my simulation, it's found that the ice currents are influenced a great deal by ocean currents. When ocean currents are set zero, the simulated sea ice currents are better than those with ocean currents from ROMS employed. The simulated ocean currents are not good. For example, the Transpolar Drift cann't be reproduced. The ocean currents near north pole seem to be a result of quasi-balance of coriolis force and surface driving due to wind stress and ocean-ice stress. I once made an experiment with no ice effect considered, i.e., there is no ice cover at all (the temperature of the uppermost layer is set to freezing point if it's below that value), there seems no improvement in the result. I guess, if the surface ocean currents are slow down to some extent and coriolis force reduces, the simulated currents' direction near the pole may be better. I'm sure the wind stress is appropriate.

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